Phytotherapy

Phytotherapy is a modern term for Herbal Medicine. The term medicine is correctly used. Herbal medicine is very very old, from the time that our ancestors not even had a paper to write information about it on it, important details, how to use it. All indigenous tribes had an own medicine man, or woman, who learned it from an elder, a wise elder, who learned it from another elder in the tribe.

In the Middle Ages the monks in monasteries started to cultivate medicinal herbs in their own gardens, studied them, and wrote down their knowledge, derived from experience, study, tests, research. The herbs that have been studied in these monasteries have the addition: officinalis. (Photo: Valeriana Officinalis. The photo has been taken in the surroundings of where I live in Norway. It grows everywhere here, in the wild. The flower is beautiful, but the roots are used for herbal medicine.)

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Valeriana

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Science has stolen this knowledge, and made chemical versions, or used details from the medicinal herb. After that the pharmaceutical industry expanded, and became booming business. The pharmaceutical industry is a multi national in the meantime, doing everything to kill natural medicine, by briefing lies about it. This has created a gap between mainstream medicine and natural medicine. The pharmaceutical industry proves to create bad products: these are addictive, suppressing the symptoms, not healing the cause, and have strong negative side effects. The left overs disappear in the toilet, and pollute drinking water systems, rivers.

Unfortunately there are still not enough phytotherapists who can offer the original authentic natural herbs, which are not addictive, and do not have side effects; phytotherapists, who know about dosage, about all the working substances, the natural chemicals in each plant; phytotherapists who are offering a safe use of medicinal herbs. Medicinal herbs are sometimes even highly dangerous when used wrong, or combined with mainstream medicine. The term “medicine” is a warning. Advice: visit a professional, acknowledged therapist and do not experiment with it.

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Can phytotherapy replace pharmacy?

No, medicinal herbs cannot replace mainstream medicine, not when the symptoms are too strong, and the signs of disbalance have become a real heavy illness. Doctors are and stay needed as long humans do not have learned to live in harmony with what is sane, and healthy. The best doctor is the one who starts with prevention, and using medicinal herbs, instead of chemicals to achieve that. When somebody has problems with sleeping, for instance, it is very easy to take time to find out why. Often simple relaxing foot massages are a solution, or a coach, therapist, and these treatments can be supported by the use of medicinal herbs.

Too many doctors, maybe 99% of them, start immediately with some sleeping pills. These are “innocent”, they say.

They are not. Soon you get used to them, and need a stronger variant. This is an endless story. Finally the road back to health is longer than the traject to where you started with asking for help. Why do doctors tell these wrong stories to their patients? Fact is that already on universities students are under the influence of (overruled by) industries, and make an agreement of cooperation. Yes, science has become a whore. Universities and governments know this, and laugh about it.

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About Multerland

Multerland collects and creates educational information via blog posts, links, articles, books, films, photos, videos, and tweets about care for nature, natural health, holistic medicine, holistic therapies, deep ecology, biodynamic farming, sustainability, climate change, life processes, spirituality, awareness, mindfulness.
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